Friday, September 15, 2017

My First Spoken Word

Hello Poetteers,


Since we are celebrating A to Z Poetry and my 4th author anniversary I thought I would share with you my first poems. The very first poem I wrote was when I was 5 about a doctor and a cat. While learning about poetry my first poem was about where I'm from. But that was a school assignment. I believe that piece set the tone and foundation for my writing career. That summer I wrote my first unprompted poem about my thoughts on Malaysia. The poems 'Writing Journal' and 'Sisters' were part of the first batch of poems written.

Eventually, I tried spoken word. It was more of a poetry reading. My first one was part of a class assignment. I was nervous and quiet but being able to sit down helped calm me. What also calmed me was looking at a familiar face. After reading the first couple of lines I forgot the nerves and that an audience was watching me. I was feeling the poem. Afterwards, I asked a friend how I did. I was loud and clear. I didn't think anything else of it.


Two years later I went to a youth faith camp. I had just published my first book a few months ago. I decided to go for it and share a poem from it. My friends were encouraging me to share. My nerves were through the roof. I was practicing through the whole day. Before the actual performance, I did a practice one in front a few friends. I was getting excited.

I hinted about it in my blog post about needing spoken word.

I couldn't sit still in my seat. My friends were amazing and understanding. They let me be one of the first acts of the night. Everyone was sitting in a half circle and the room was dimmed. The mic helped me be loud and clear. But my performance was short. I cared but also didn't. 

I loved the sound of fingers snapping as I performed my poem. After doing my first spoken word I felt excited by the warm feeling it gave me. I wanted to do it again and have that feeling again. It was empowering and gave me the confidence I needed. With this experience, I'm growing as a poet. It was once a bucket list item. Do you remember your first time and how did it make you feel?

Read more: annual look at bucket list | poetry transitions

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Tuesday, September 12, 2017

A Poet Lesson: Write Poetry Slowly

Hello Poetteers,

Yesterday was day three of the slay edits challenge. The prompt was a poetry lesson. See my response in the video below.


Stay inspired,
Fida

Friday, September 8, 2017

Inspiration If Needed

Hello Poetteers,


The other day I found a deck of index cards with a post it note that read "inspiration if needed." I made this back in high school in a creative writing class. I think the teacher made us do this in the beginning of the year for when we felt like we had nothing to write. It has been a few years since I looked through it. Some writing things have changed while others didn't.

There are 19 ideas written on these cards. It reads of chocolate, sisterhood, a few quotes, and song lyrics, cities and tourist sites, free spirit, small gestures, volunteer work, struggling Muslim, unbearable heat, spring, blossoms, and birds chirping. One just said, "my favorites." Another tells me about national poetry month and writing one poem a day.

I have participated in NPM a few times. The ones that surprised me are volunteer work and free spirit. I have no idea what I meant by that. I do enjoy my chocolate.

Looking back I used to write a few poems about countries but haven't continued. The same goes with nature, I used to write a lot but then stopped. I'm trying to get back into it. I'm still inspired by song lyrics and small gestures. To this day I write about sisterhood and being a Muslim.

Comment: Has your inspiration changed?

Read more: Raise the Inspiration | Inspiration Behind Hugs & Kisses 

Stay inspired,
Fida